Fashion is everywhere

Chez Larsson

How to reglaze a window

Beware. Lengthy potentially boring post!

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One of my least favourite renovating projects is reglazing windows. This time the boat room window got stuck and as Martin pushed it hard on one side the pane broke. I had planned on repainting and recementing the putty on this window and had "saved" it for next year but now that the outer pane on the double glazing broke I had to do something about it before it gets to cold. Because this window swings out from the top of the frame we had to remove the whole thing and board the opening up until it was all finished.

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Wille caught me with surprize as I removed the broken panes. The inner one had a hairline crack too and I decided to change them both while I was at it. I broke the panes bit by bit wearing the attractive safety glasses and gloves.

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Once all the glass and dried old putty was removed I sanded the frame down with my trusted mouse.

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I painted the window frame inside and out with a new special window paint that supposedly will not stick as much as the older versions. I wasn't entirely happy with the paint. It was kind of like painting wood with an emulsion.  Hopefully it will be ok.

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Our new panes waiting to be mounted. Packages like these always freak me out. I get the feeling I'll break then just by looking at them.

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Gooooo!!! This is the linseed oil putty. Very sticky so wear rubber gloves for this job.

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I then pressed the putty all around into the frame for the first pane to rest on. No need to do a nice job at this point. Just make sure there's putty everywhere.

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Once the pane was laid on top of the putty I pressed lightly all the way around. This will make the putty squeeze out underneath…  

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…so you then take a putty knife and scrape off the excess. Just pull it along the pane and frame.

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To make the pane stay put inside of the frame you hammer in these special metal pins. They come in a long stick and once you've hammered one in you break it off…

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… and it looks like this. Hammering along the pane is a little bit intmidating, but the glass is stronger than you think so don't worry, it'll be ok. 

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More putty. This time on the top of the pane along the frame. Again you go all around and … 

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…then take your putty knife, place it at an angle and pull it at a 45 degree angle along the frame and pane. Pick off the excess…

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… and when you're done take a brush, dip it in water and brush the putty. This apparently helps harden the putty and a the same time you even out little bumps.   

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Because the putty is so sticky you will get some on the frame and pane so use a lint free cloth with some white spirit on it and clean along the putty. 

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This is what it looks like when done. This type of putty needs to harden for weeks before it can be painted so I'm finishing the painting later on.  

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Because I removed both panes I had to do all the steps above twice before being able to close the window. Sigh. But here I'm finally done. Yay! 

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35 Comments

  • Jean says:

    Benita,
    Should I have to ever do this, you’ve made the chore look half-way doable! I love the last image with the shade partly down as if to say “And that’s all – good-bye!”

  • Jean says:

    Benita,
    Should I have to ever do this, you’ve made the chore look half-way doable! I love the last image with the shade partly down as if to say “And that’s all – good-bye!”

  • Anna @ D16 says:

    Ugh, this is my least favorite thing to do, but every weekend I try to repair at least one of the many windows in my house! I really don’t like to complain, though, because it’s far better to have old, wood windows that can be repaired than to have new vinyl windows that eventually fall apart and need to be replaced. I do love my old windows, and most of them have the original blown glass panes intact. It’s just the glazing that has dried up and fallen out.
    I don’t know if you can get it in Sweden, but I’ve been experimenting with DAP Latex Window Glazing, and it seems very good so far. You use it in a caulk gun, so it’s easier to work with than putty. Also, I use glazing “points” rather than pins. There’s a little tool made just for putting them in — makes things a bit easier!

  • Anna @ D16 says:

    Ugh, this is my least favorite thing to do, but every weekend I try to repair at least one of the many windows in my house! I really don’t like to complain, though, because it’s far better to have old, wood windows that can be repaired than to have new vinyl windows that eventually fall apart and need to be replaced. I do love my old windows, and most of them have the original blown glass panes intact. It’s just the glazing that has dried up and fallen out.
    I don’t know if you can get it in Sweden, but I’ve been experimenting with DAP Latex Window Glazing, and it seems very good so far. You use it in a caulk gun, so it’s easier to work with than putty. Also, I use glazing “points” rather than pins. There’s a little tool made just for putting them in — makes things a bit easier!

  • Mandy says:

    I have to admit this isn’t the kind of thing I’d even attempt to do on my own! I’m impressed!

  • Rachel says:

    It’s so cool to see how this is done!

  • Rachel says:

    It’s so cool to see how this is done!

  • Linnea says:

    I have been reading your blog for quite some time now, and I always pictured you looking something like Bree van de Kamp, the redhead desperate housewife.
    This chore is definitely something Bree wouldn’t do, but then you don’t look anything like her either. At least not with those glasses on!

  • Linnea says:

    I have been reading your blog for quite some time now, and I always pictured you looking something like Bree van de Kamp, the redhead desperate housewife.
    This chore is definitely something Bree wouldn’t do, but then you don’t look anything like her either. At least not with those glasses on!

  • Martha says:

    I am impressed! Looks great!

  • Martha says:

    I am impressed! Looks great!

  • ana says:

    “Packages like these always freak me out. I get the feeling I’ll break then just by looking at them.”
    LOL me to. I guess it is a blessing to be able to do all those things, it saves so much money and one can be really proud to say I made all that. I am not handy at all, but admire really people who are. I am much better in baking cakes.
    Whare did you learn all that???
    One more thing – your figure is really good!

  • ana says:

    “Packages like these always freak me out. I get the feeling I’ll break then just by looking at them.”
    LOL me to. I guess it is a blessing to be able to do all those things, it saves so much money and one can be really proud to say I made all that. I am not handy at all, but admire really people who are. I am much better in baking cakes.
    Whare did you learn all that???
    One more thing – your figure is really good!

  • Kel says:

    Hi – just wondering, is the hinge of the window, really on the outside of the house??
    Seems like it would be more secure if it was on the inside! You really did a fantastic job of the reglazing. I do it from to time, but mine usually don’t look so professional!

  • Benita says:

    Anna. thanks for the tip! I’ve used a similar latex product when I did changed all the panes on the boat. Didn’t think of that when I did this one… Ive done quite a few of the windows around the house so I just went with the stuff I’d gotten used to I guess. Those glazing points sound interesting, will see if there’s something similar over here. I’m sure there will be another window to mend soon…
    Linnea,
    I wish I ever looked as polished as Bree. I pay a lot of attention to my home and not so much to myself I’m afraid 🙂
    Ana, I learned because I had to I guess. When we moved in we didn’t have a lot of money so when a window broke I read up on the basics in a book and just went for it.

  • Benita says:

    Anna. thanks for the tip! I’ve used a similar latex product when I did changed all the panes on the boat. Didn’t think of that when I did this one… Ive done quite a few of the windows around the house so I just went with the stuff I’d gotten used to I guess. Those glazing points sound interesting, will see if there’s something similar over here. I’m sure there will be another window to mend soon…
    Linnea,
    I wish I ever looked as polished as Bree. I pay a lot of attention to my home and not so much to myself I’m afraid 🙂
    Ana, I learned because I had to I guess. When we moved in we didn’t have a lot of money so when a window broke I read up on the basics in a book and just went for it.

  • Joan says:

    Boring? Not hardly. What a great tutorial. I had no idea about the little pins/wires that go into the frame to hold the glass. Thanks, Benita. I learned a ton from this post.
    Joan

  • Joan says:

    Boring? Not hardly. What a great tutorial. I had no idea about the little pins/wires that go into the frame to hold the glass. Thanks, Benita. I learned a ton from this post.
    Joan

  • Kat says:

    Wow, that looks like quite a job! I love your new colour scheme by the way.

  • Kat says:

    Wow, that looks like quite a job! I love your new colour scheme by the way.

  • Julia says:

    Hej Benita!
    Jag undrar hur du gör när du skickar tidningar och annat till din swopping-friend i USA och andra länder?
    Det blir ju en så himla dyr fraktkostnad… 260 kr för en tidning och lite pyssel.
    Tack på förhand!

  • Julia says:

    Hej Benita!
    Jag undrar hur du gör när du skickar tidningar och annat till din swopping-friend i USA och andra länder?
    Det blir ju en så himla dyr fraktkostnad… 260 kr för en tidning och lite pyssel.
    Tack på förhand!

  • indigorchid says:

    Wow, so impressive! You are quite talented, and very inspiring!

  • indigorchid says:

    Wow, so impressive! You are quite talented, and very inspiring!

  • Benita says:

    Kel, I know… So weird. It’s the only window in our house with the hinges on the outside. God knows why…

  • Benita says:

    Kel, I know… So weird. It’s the only window in our house with the hinges on the outside. God knows why…

  • Lessie says:

    Really enjoyed this post. You help me think I can do it too!

  • Tasneem says:

    Ok that’s it, you’re officially a superwoman in my books! First building your own furniture, now fixing a window! whoah hats off to you benita!!
    🙂 tas

  • Tasneem says:

    Ok that’s it, you’re officially a superwoman in my books! First building your own furniture, now fixing a window! whoah hats off to you benita!!
    🙂 tas

  • Hongkong says:

    Great job Benita! I love your work and follow it from Germany!

  • Eva says:

    Thanks for including all the pictures!
    I’m in the process of buying a home with windows that are in desperate need of reglazing (the glass is mostly fine, but the putty is like 50 years old and not doing so well), so this will be really helpful.
    I’m also really enjoying all your house pictures. Thanks for the inspiration! 😀

  • Well done!Winter is here and cold weather is at every home.It’s important that every part of your home were prepared.Most especially,on windows.Double glazing widows will give you a comfortable ambiance,lessen the noise from outside and cares for the environment.

  • Well that’s simple enough. I think the most difficult part would be applying the putty and flatting it. I tried it – took several tries before I perfected it. The best thing to use to keep the putty level are your wet fingers. Just wash them afterward. My dad mixes the putty with a bit of motor oil to make it more pliable, but this is not really necessary.

  • Katie Nicoll says:

    That was indeed a lengthy post, but not boring at all! Hm, I think I just might try this procedure on our windows to sort of update their look. Hope you don’t mind, but can you post the total cost of doing this? Thanks!

  • This was four years ago so I can’t remember I’m afraid. The window pane was around USD 70 at the time and I’m guesstimating the whole thing came to around 90?